Australasian Sketcher. 1880

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17 January

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Wild dogs watching kangaroos by moonlight

 

31 January

 

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Selectors clearing the forest

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A Victorian selector’s homestead

The first thing a selector does, after having obtained his occupation licence, is to build a hut of bark or slabs, and to enclose a small paddock with a temporary fence for his horses and bullocks. Then begins the work of splitting posts and rails for the fence that is to surround his selection, and this having been completed, the great task of clearing the land begins. It requires, indeed, a strong arm and stout heart to settle in the wild forest, where the timber grows to an enormous size, and the scrub and undergrowth are so dense that a man in many places can hardly push his way through. From sunrise to sunset the selector’s axe  can be heard ringing through the forest, and very often on moonlight nights, after he has had his evening meal, he turns to work again far into the night, burning logs and debris that have been dragged together during the day with the aid of bullocks.

14 February

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The Melbourne Exchange, Collins Street

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Shipping wheat at Sandridge pier for England

AUSTRALIAN FEDERATION

The subject of federation of the colonies, after having been on the shelf for some time, has of late been taken dawn, dusted and presented as a live topic of discussion, by two review articles from the pen of Sir Henry Parkes and the Hon. Mr. Douglas of Queensland. Sir Henry Parkes contended that federation or legislative union of the colonies, instead of being a difficult matter, was easy of attainment, and could, as far as the three colonies of New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia were concerned, be reached within a year or so desired.  Sir H. Parkes did not explain the details of the process by which this end was to be attained and, indeed, it is evident that the matter is one, the whole difficult of which lies in these insignificant details. Mr. Douglas took a different view of the question. He […] argued that when time was right the foundations of an Australian nation should be laid by the union of all the colonies. Mr. Douglas took the view that the colonies should be contented with nothing less than “nationality” and further contended that to obtain this complete independence was essential. Thus he looked on to separation from the Empire as one of the preliminary steps f Australian consolidation and nationality.

10 April

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Lady students at the university : A glimpse of the future

The recent admission of ladies to the privileges of the Melbourne University has inspired our artist to take a dip into the future a good deal further than human eye can see. He has embodied his visions in some sketches showing some of the possible developments of the change lately inaugurated. But the portrait of Miss Caroline Ann Marion Boyd, the first lady who matriculated and became a member of the University, does not come under the category of prophetic views, but represents a very pleasing reality. This young lady is a native of Victoria, having  been born at Sandhurst […] The privilege granted by the council of allowing ladies to graduate came into operation on the 22nd. of last month
Miss. Boyd made – application on the 23rd, undertook the necessary obligations, and matriculated as a student thereby becoming the first lady student of the Melbourne University. Passing to the anticipative sketches, we have one raising the question. ‘Are there to be Lady Professors ? and giving the portraits of three professoresses’. Then we have lady students ‘At Study,’ while perambulating the grounds, and ‘ Their Alma Mater,’ a fierce’ looking old professoress in cap and gown.

22 May

ORGANISATION OF THE EMPIRE

It must be admitted, we think, by every competent and impartial person that the Empire of Great Britain, has reached a point where it behoves her statesmen to look around them and see what can be done for the organisation and federation of that mighty realm. The great empire, which has vast territories in every quarter of the globe, has grown up in a fortuitous manner and its texture bears every mark of its loose, occasional origin. No attempt has been made to give organic shape to a huge assemblage of dependencies: The result is, that we have a large number of rapidly-growing, wealthy, high-spirited communities, which are jealous to a fault of any interference from outside, united to the home country by a tie which has no regular connexion, with the constitutional Governments of those communities.

The home Legislature and Government have no means of imposing their decisions on any of the self-governing colonies, and the colonies have no lot or share in the counsels of the home Government, though their fate may be seriously influenced by its decisions and its actions. The Governments of the colonies and of the empire are in no relation whatever.

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The view of Daylesford

5 June

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The Queen’s Birthday: hoisting the royal standard on Government House

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Kyneton

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A meet of the Melbourne Bicycle Club

There has of late been a great extension of the interest in bicycling in Melbourne, due in large degree perhaps to the admirable quality and efficiency of the bicycles that have been introduced. The Melbourne Bicycle Club now numbers about 40 members, and holds occasional races, and organises long expeditions. Our illustration depicts a recent meet of the club at Brighton.

19 June

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Chinese furniture makers, Little Burke Street

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‘Tween decks in an intercolonial steamer

THE CHINESE QUESTION AGAIN

The Chinese question is one which is always turning up. We have it always with us. Sometimes we think we are rid of it, and that it is fairly laid or proved to be a mere nullity, and then comes a shuffle of political cards, or some industrial incident, that brings it back to us in full force. It seems curious that it should be so when we reflect on the very small number of Chinese in these colonies by which the panic is occasioned […] In Melbourne, where there has been some fitful agitation on the subject, the Chinese artisans by which the panic has been produced number, according to the closest estimates, only 60 or 70.

17 July

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Liverpool Street, Hobart Town

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The new Adelaide Exchange

31 July

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Blackfellows spearing eels, Gipps Land

20 November

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Last scene of the Kelly drama: the criminal on the scaffold

… executions are private in Victoria, and usually take place in the Melbourne Gaol. The part of the gaol where they take place is in what we call the transept of one of the buildings. The culprit on the night before execution is placed in the condemned cell on the second tier of cells, and the door of the cell opens on to the gallery running round the building. A beam is fixed across the recess, and a few steps from the door of the cell take the culprit on to the drop and below this beam. The fall of the drop allows the body to descend through the floor of the gallery, a distance of about 8ft.

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Review on the Prince of Wales’s Birthday

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